How to Waterproof Wood for Bathroom: Step-by-Step Guide

Using wood in a bathroom requires some thought to prevent pooled water from leaving water stains or high humidity levels causing decay. If you don’t use the correct finishes, your wood will incur damage, mold, and rot, which can be bad for your health, unpleasant to look at, and costly to fix. In this article, we’ll discuss several methods to waterproof wood for a bathroom to ensure you get the maximum life from your decor.

Despite the huge variety of products on the market, there are three principal methods of making wood resistant to water. 

  • Surface sealants – this envelope the wood in a plastic-like coating that prevents water ingress.
  • Oils – we know that oil and water don’t mix and that oil soaks into the timber, so when used as a surface finish, oils nourish the timber while repelling water.
  • Nano-sealants – These sealants work at a microscopic level, penetrating deeply into the wood’s pores to block capillaries, preventing moisture ingress while allowing the wood to breathe.

Some products can use all three methods to provide the desired protection. So how do you choose? Looks, cost, and durability are three factors driving product selection, so let’s look at each wood treatment method and discuss its pros and cons.

Surface Sealants for Waterproofing Wood

You’ll hear several names used to describe these products, including polyurethane, varnish, lacquer, and shellac. The difference between these products is due to the resins and solvents used in their manufacture. Therefore, each offers different advantages and benefits based on its constituent parts.

Shellac

Shellac is a natural product made by mixing alcohol with the resin secreted onto trees by the female lac bug, sold in flakes. Comprising various acids and waxes, it provides a natural stain, sealant, and high-gloss varnish. Primarily used on fine furniture, antiques, and interior woodwork.

De-Waxed Super Blonde Shellac Flakes
Photo: Amazon

Pros

  • Non-toxic -Food safe
  • Dries quickly – Is easily repaired
  • Adds a warm amber color to wood – Applies to almost all surfaces
  • Most finishes can be applied over shellac

Cons

  • Not particularly waterproof – Can be damaged by heat and chemicals

Lacquer

Modern lacquer comprises cellulose treated with nitric and sulfuric acid and uses plasticizers, pigments, and other resins (such as acrylic) to enhance specific properties like durability, sheen, or color. Commonly applied by spray and used on indoor furniture.

General Finishes Enduro Pre-Cat Lacquer
Photo: Amazon

Pros

  • A reasonable level of water resistance, as long as exposure is not prolonged
  • Dries very quickly
  • Durable, scratch-resistant finish

Cons

  • Degrades or clouds on prolonged exposure to water
  • High volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
  • Can yellow over time
  • Not resistant to UV

Polyurethane

Polyurethane is a synthetic resin made by reacting a polyol with a diisocyanate or a polymeric isocyanate in the presence of certain catalysts and additives. Manufacturers include additives to modify properties like flow characteristics, drying time, durability, and resistance to UV light. You can buy oil-based or water-based polyurethane. It is commonly used for floors, kitchens, bathrooms, and outdoor furniture.

Pros

  • Forms a hard, plastic-like layer over wood, sealing it from moisture and water – damage
  • Flexible finish
  • Superior waterproofing capabilities
  • Very durable
  • Resistant to chemicals and heat
  • It can be purchased in various finishes, from matte to glossy.
  • Water-based polyurethane dries quickly to a clear finish with fewer odors
  • Oil-based polyurethane can last ten years before a reapplication is required

Cons

  • Oil-based polyurethane can yellow over time, has more odors, and takes longer to dry

Varnish

Varnishes can be natural or synthetic, combining wood oils, resins, and solvents. The inclusion of oil nourishes wood and helps repel water. Varnish dries through the oxidation and polymerization of the oils, meaning it cures by reacting with oxygen in the air. It is often used for outdoor projects and surfaces exposed to water, like boats and outdoor furniture.

Old Masters 92304 Spar Marine Varnish
Photo: Amazon

Pros

  • Highly resistant to water and moisture
  • Provides a hard, durable finish
  • Adds a warm amber hue to the wood

Cons

  • It can be hard to apply it smoothly
  • Takes longer to dry than shellac and lacquer

Applying Surface Sealants To Wood

  1. Lacquer is normally applied by spray, while polyurethane and shellac can be applied with a brush. 
  2. Ensure the wood is sanded smooth, all sanding dust is removed from the area, and the wood is dry.
  3. Apply several thin coats in a well-ventilated room, allowing each coat to dry before reapplying.
  4. Lightly sand between coats with fine sandpaper.
  5. Remember to observe the manufacturer’s recommended drying times.

Oils for Waterproofing Wood

Two types of oils are used in woodwork: drying and non-drying. If we want reasonably persistent water protection, we need a drying oil that hardens to a tough surface film in contact with air. Let’s be clear, however: oils are not as good at water protection as sealants, but they do provide some protection while nourishing the wood. 

When drying oils are exposed to oxygen, the hardening process occurs through polymerization or crosslinking. Drying oils that are commonly available are tung oil, linseed oil, and walnut oil. You’ll also see people quoting products like Danish Oil and Teak Oil; these are not pure oils but mixtures of the previously mentioned drying oils with some additives; however, they’re readily available, and some are good products, so we’ll include these in our discussion. Let’s look at the properties, pros, and cons.

Tung oil

Tung oil is produced by pressing the seed from the nut of the tung tree. The tree is of Chinese origin and has been used for centuries to produce oil, originally to waterproof ships’ hulls. Raw tung oil can produce a wrinkled finish as it dries, but today, the oil is heated during manufacture to increase its viscosity, prevent the wrinkling effect, and improve its film-forming characteristics. 

HOPE'S 100% Pure Tung Oil
Photo: Amazon

Pros

  • The best water resistance of the drying oils
  • Finishes can be satin through to glossy, depending on thinning
  • Has a slight golden tint
  • Dries very hard
  • Less prone to mold than linseed oil

Cons

  • Takes 1 to 4 weeks to cure, depending on the temperature

Linseed oil

Linseed oil is manufactured by pressing dry, ripened flax seeds. Its edible form is known as flaxseed or raw linseed oil. However, it does not dry well in this state. To be useful for wood application, raw linseed oil is mixed with linseed oil that has been boiled to undergo chemical change, and drying agents are added. Boiled linseed oil is not edible or food-safe.

Klean-Strip Green GLO45 Boiled Linseed Oil
Photo: Amazon

Pros

  • Light yellow or amber color
  • Slow drying
  • Low shrinkage

Cons

  • Not very resistant to water
  • Easily scratched
  • Known to mildew or turn black over time when in the presence of moisture

Walnut oil

Pressing walnuts produces walnut oil, a lightly colored and scented food oil. Like all food oils, pure walnut oil will go rancid over time, so the oil we use on wood is heat-treated to remove the proteins, alter the chemical characteristics to prevent deterioration and make the oil hard-drying. 

Dr Adorable - 32 oz - Walnut Oil
Photo: Amazon

Pros

  • Fast curing – half the time of tung oil
  • Thin, so it deeply penetrates the wood fibers 
  • Foodsafe for wooden objects used in food preparation
  • Good water resistance – better than linseed oil and just behind tung oil
  • Often mixed with beeswax for finishing timber

Cons

  • You’ll use more due to its low viscosity

Danish oil

Danish oil is a combination of oils and varnish. There is no specific recipe, so each manufacturer uses their own mixture and additives. If you wish to mix your own, a common combination is one-third varnish, and the balance is a mix of linseed oil and tung oil. With Danish oil, you get the best of both worlds by nourishing the wood while getting greater water resistance due to the varnish. You’ll see some woodworkers claiming Danish oil is food-safe. However, that is incorrect if it has boiled linseed oil as a constituent.

Walrus Oil - Furniture Finish Danish Oil
Photo: Amazon

Pros

  • Better water resistance than pure drying oils due to the varnish
  • Reasonably quick drying time
  • Easily applied
  • Matte or low-sheen finish

Cons

  • Scratches easily
  • Not food safe due to the linseed oil

Teak oil

Teak oil is another hybrid oil that’s even harder to pin down than Danish oil. A great study was done some years ago by a woodworker and boatbuilder who analyzed many proprietary products on the market at the time; he found teak oil to be so varied in ingredients as to make the name meaningless. Different manufacturers used either wax and turpentine, pure linseed oil, pure tung oil, a mix of mineral oil and dehydrated castor oil, pure varnish, or an oil and varnish blend. This variety makes it impossible to make a statement about the efficacy or otherwise of teak oil when we don’t know what it may contain. You’ll need to be guided by the manufacturer’s claims.

Minwax Teak Oil
Photo: Amazon

Pros

  • Depends entirely on what your particular brand contains
  • If primarily oils or waxes, it nourishes the wood

Cons

  • No certainty on whether it is water-resistant or food-safe

Applying Drying Oils To Wood

  1. Caution must be exercised when using drying oils, as oil-soaked rags may spontaneously ignite as they dry due to the heat generated by an exothermic reaction with air. Wash them in soapy water and hang them out to dry individually.
  2. Apply to properly sanded wood with a natural bristle paintbrush. 
  3. Allow it to dry before lightly sanding it with fine sandpaper, then apply another coat.
  4. Apply as many coats as you need to get the desired finish and coverage.

Nano-sealants for Waterproofing Wood

This type of sealant has been used in the construction industry for years but is relatively new to the retail market; however, it’s catching on fast. The principal behind nano-sealants is using chemicals like silane, siloxane, or silicone as a waterproofing ingredient. 

These products have small molecular structures that penetrate the gaps and capillaries in wood or other substances and fully or partially block them. They prevent the large water molecules from entering, permitting smaller water vapor molecules within the timber to evaporate. Engineers refer to this as a breathable membrane. Some products combine these nano-sealants with polyurethane or varnish to get a double effect, sealing the wood’s pores and the surface.

Rain Guard Pro All Purpose Deep Penetrating Water Repellent Protection for Wood
Photo: Amazon

Pros

  • Highly water resistant
  • Don’t yellow
  • Natural finish
  • Environmentally friendly

Cons

  • Some products can be costly
  • Not UV resistant

Applying Nano Sealants To Wood

  1. Ensure the wood surface is clean and dry
  2. Apply the sealant by spraying until you get pooling or run-off
  3. If some areas dry more quickly than others, apply a second light coat
  4. The surface is normally touch dry in 1 hour, although full cure takes a week.

A Note On Stain Sealants

You’ll often read advice that shows stain sealants as a fourth waterproofing method. It isn’t. As the name suggests, it’s simply a sealant with some pigment added to apply color to the wood. Stain adds no waterproofing capabilities, although the color can provide limited UV protection. Stain sealants are ideal if you want to seal your wood and apply some color simultaneously. Otherwise, you can stain the wood separately and then apply your chosen sealant over the top. 

Olympic Maximum Wood Stain And Sealer For Decks
Photo: Amazon

The pros and cons of stain sealant are largely related to the type of sealant being used, with the added bonus of applying a desired color at the same time as you seal, saving you some time.

Conclusion

It’s worth noting that while we speak about waterproofing wood, no surface covering or sealant is truly waterproof without ongoing maintenance. It degrades in sunlight, gets scratched, or the wood swells, moves, and cracks. Whatever surface coating you select, there will come a time when you will need to maintain it by lightly sanding it back and reapplying the surface finish.

I trust the information in this article has helped you decide the surface finish best suited to your bathroom and provided a finish that protects your wood and suits your decor.

Frequently Asked Questions

Wood can be used in bathroom or showers as long as sealers applied to it is maintained. If wood is taken care of, it will last a long time.

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Yes, waterproofing wood for the shower can be achieved by using sealers.

They’re usually a clear/transparent finish that goes on the outside of the wood. Sealants such as polyurethane, varnish, and lacquer give excellent waterproofing and can be used for showers.

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Be sure to ventilate the bathroom well with extractor fans or windows. Clean up any spills and wipe down moist surfaces to accelerate drying. Reapply the sealant regularly to maintain the protection level.

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There are different methods to waterproof bathroom wood but using a sealant is one of the best methods to do so.

Sealers can waterproof the wood, they can also prevent wooden surfaces from getting scratched. They are often a clear/transparent finish that coats the wood’s exterior surface.

Sealants such as polyurethane, varnish, and lacquer give excellent waterproofing. They’re brushed or sprayed over sanded, clean wood, then softly re-sanded and re-coated when they’ve dried fully. They offer high moisture resistance compared to the oil finish.

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Yes, it’s designed for boats, and it contains oils to nourish the wood and UV blockers to protect deterioration from the sun’s rays. However, it’s a great product for use in humid environments like a bathroom.

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One of the best sealers for wood in the bathroom is spar-urethane.

It’s frequently used on submerged wood, like boat hulls. This particular finish is intended to endure the weather on the hardwood poles that hold a boat’s sails, commonly known as the ship’s spars.

Spar urethane was designed to endure difficult circumstances and preserve the ship’s spars since this piece of wood must withstand severe wetness and wind.

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Be sure to seal all joints with a bathroom sealant or caulk, and where possible, select wood that is naturally durable, like teak, cedar, or mahogany.

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One of the best wood for bathrooms showers is teak.

Teak is one of the few hardwoods that can withstand damp circumstances due to its low shrinkage in changing weather and great resistance to rot, fungus, and mildew. It has natural anti-slip qualities and is remains the most often used material for boat decking today.

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William Stewart

The proud owner and lead writer of WoodImprove.com. Started writing in 2018 and sharing his love and passion for wood treatments and crafts.

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Jess
Jess
8 months ago

Hey!
Great article, very helpful!
I just wanted a little advice on which varnish to use if possible?
we bought three wooden doors for our flat and have stained them with exterior Sadolin stain (we were told it’d be the hardiest and we liked the colour so went with it). One of the doors is for the bathroom so I wanted to put a varnish on top to protect them and have been looking into polyurethane. Would an exterior varnish be recommended to make the finish even hardier and more protected from moisture? As the ventilation in the bathroom is not very good so there will be a lot of moisture. And if so, is there a brand/ product in particular you’d reccommend? This is my first time doing anything like this so any advice you have is amazing! Thank you so much! 🙂

Debbie Johnson
Debbie Johnson
10 months ago

Our house is 118 years old and is made of tongue and groove pine. The walls and floors. We’re remodeling the bathroom and have some tongue and groove boards I want to use for the bathroom floor. Previously these boards were wallpapered but no glue was used on the wood. How can I waterproof the floors so they will match the rest of the floors in my house. What’s the best solution?

Emme
Emme
1 year ago

Hi William!
Your web page is incredible, thank you!
I have an old wash stand with a hole in the top for a basin and jug (which I don’t want).
I have a piece of bamboo that has been cut to size with edges finished to place on the top!
I want to waterproof this as it’s going in a bathroom. After reading your article Im leaning toward the stain sealer option… is this ok for bamboo?
Thanks,
Emme

Skip Roberts
Skip Roberts
1 year ago

I’m going to use cedar siding shingles on my bathroom shower walls , should I pre seal them before install or just seal it all after install and what sealant product would work best .

Tim Gibbons
Tim Gibbons
1 year ago

Hi Derrick, I bought this acacia wood bath tray from The Futon Company about 3 years ago. It seems to have faded and dried out out in areas. Can you what is the best treatment to make it like new again (as in the ebay listing here), waterproof and resisatnt to long soaks in a steaming bathroom :-).?

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/204209578892?var=0&mkevt=1&mkcid=1&mkrid=710-53481-19255-0&campid=5338749401&toolid=20006&customid=GB_11700_204209578892.144241308393~1872316465195-g_EAIaIQobChMI2rPw6vjW_AIVEOrtCh1mGQ69EAYYASABEgLCjfD_BwE

Many thanks,
Tim

Derrick Brown
Derrick Brown
1 year ago

I want a sealant I can apply to a plywood wall prior to tiling
I dont mind if its clear or coloured as long as it seals the wood
I dont mind if its a spray or a brush applying it
I just want it to seal the ply

David and Elise K
David and Elise K
1 year ago

Hi, Thanks for all your info. It’s so interesting in so many ways.

We just put in a new tub and tub surround. I’d like to put Caribbean heart pine above the surround on all three sides up to the 10′ ceiling. We have the CHP for flooring in our house and finished it with Monocoat Rubio. Can we use that above the tub? Or something else? The window trim and baseboard will also be the CHP.
Thank you!!!

Maddie Broad
Maddie Broad
1 year ago

Hi there, this has been by far the most helpful information on the internet in my searches so far!!

There is aot of info here which I am taking in, but I’d be grateful if you could advise me..:

I am doing a van conversion and have an unfinished shower room. The walls are made of ply. Rather than sticking pvc on top and sealing all joins, which could add a lot of weight and cost, I would like to find the best way to waterproof the ply itself. This way the seals and corners stay visible in case of spotting and fixing future leaky troubles. My budget is small… Is linseed oil enough to waterproof my tiny ply box 55cm base shower room? I have a window in there for ventilation but I am also concerned that certain products could release harmful chemical fumes into my tiny home.

Thanks for your help x

Alan Howard
Alan Howard
1 year ago

Hi.. I’m putting a skirting board and tongue and groove on the back wall of my bathroom where the lavatory is. I guess I need to seal it but wanted to paint it white using regular silk paint to match the rest of the room. Can you paint over stain sealants?

Jacq
Jacq
Reply to  William Stewart
1 year ago

Can I ask how the sealant is cured? Many thanks

Charesse Hicks
Charesse Hicks
2 years ago

Thank you, William for the great information! I am going to convert a gorgeous antique dresser that my mom refinished about 50 years ago. It was in my grandmother’s boarding house for a good 40 years prior! Because it was refinished 50 years ago and has had Pledge applied occasionally over the years, do I still need to lightly sand the wood before applying whichever sealer I choose to use? Also, I thought I might put a sheet of plexiglass over the wood. I am using a raised vessel sink on this piece.
Thank you for any advise you can offer!
Charesse

Charesse Hicks
Charesse Hicks
Reply to  William Stewart
1 year ago

Thank you so very much for the information!

Samantha
Samantha
2 years ago

This is brilliant! I’ve recently bought a corona pine sideboard to go into my bathroom to be converted into a vanity with a sink. I’ve bought a countertop sink to go on top. What do think would be the best product to use to make it waterproof and if possible, can you recommend one, please

Thanks
Sam

Dorota
Dorota
2 years ago

Hi, brilliant article!
I was wondering if I could get your opinion on exposed bathrooms beams?
We exposed the old roof beams in the bathrooms in our renovation project (16th century cottage).
Is it best to leave them alone or protect with something? If so what do you think will be best?
we want to keep them looking as natural and authentic as possible?

Thanks

Dorota

Chloe
Chloe
2 years ago

Thank you for this excellent webpage. I have an oak vanity worktop in my bathroom that I have sanded down ready to seal. I would like to stain it so thought I should go for the stain-sealer combo. However, I’ve noticed that the stain sealers you recommend (such as the readyseal) seem to be for exterior wood. Is that suitable for use in the home? Also, if I wanted to go belt and braces, could I use a varnish after it? Many thanks for your help

Shannon Lee-Rutherford
Shannon Lee-Rutherford
2 years ago

Hi there – the timing on this article is perfect. I have two mosaics on furniture grade plywood that I would like to hang in bathrooms. One of the mosaics is grouted, one is not (tesserae style). Do you have any suggestions on how to prepare the wood to resist the fluctuations in temperature and moisture in a bathroom? Thanks for your help,
Shannon

Emily
Emily
2 years ago

Really helpful article- thanks so much!

Is there a particular brand of sealant you would recommend for protecting a window that inside a shower?

Any recommendations would be gratefully received!

Thanks!

Jo T
Jo T
Reply to  William Stewart
2 years ago

This is such a great page- thanks! I have a similar scenario where I have an exposed wooden beam and wooden panelling above the shower so they get steam & some splashback. Would you also recommend Polyurethane for this?
I’m not sure where best to use varnish like yacht oil vs an outside wood oil vs hardwax oil! I should add this is for the UK/European product rather than US in case you know if specific products.
Thanks so much!
Jo

Jo T
Jo T
Reply to  Jo T
2 years ago

I should add – it’s a soft wood like pine.

Ron
Ron
2 years ago

Hi Mr. Stewart:
I am converting and old trundle style sewing machine to a powder room vanity.
I will be using a vessel sink.
The wood is dry but not cracked.
I think epoxy would be best, but how can I ensure the beauty of the gold oak is brought back?
I have used Boiled Linseed Oil for many years and am comfortable with it.
Can I use BLO to bring back the colour before applying epoxy?
Thanks.

Josie
Josie
2 years ago

I am building a log home and I want to keep 2 of the log walls in the bathroom natural logs. What would be the best wood sealer to use to waterproof them? The logs are pine, and smooth.
Thank you

Josie
Josie
Reply to  Josie
2 years ago

it’s brand new wood 🙂

Josie
Josie
Reply to  William Stewart
2 years ago

Thank you

Laura
Laura
2 years ago

Hello William this was very interesting ,thanks.

I am buying a vanity made by engenering wood and I will be adding a sink on top for my bathroom. Do you recoment this type of wood for bathroom and if so what varnish/oil/seal should I use to protect it from water spil and humidity ?
Also what type of wood do you recomend the most for bathroom vanities
Many thanks in advance

Andrew Cooke
Andrew Cooke
2 years ago

Hi William,

Nice article but I’m still unsure what method to use for my bathroom.

I have some reclaimed wood panels to use around a bath.
I was going to stain them and then apply some teak oil over the stain.

I was reading about teak oil and teak sealant.
What is the difference and would I need to use both?

Also, can I mix the stain with the oil/sealant?

Thank in advance.

Andrew Cooke
Andrew Cooke
Reply to  William Stewart
2 years ago

Thanks William, but what if I don’t want the finish to be glossy?

Katherine Roopchand
Katherine Roopchand
2 years ago

Can you recommend a good Stain – sealant product. I will be using it on a bath panel

Teresa
Teresa
2 years ago

Hi William

We are up cycling an old pine sideboard which has already been painted into a vanity unit in a cloakroom (no shower or bath).
As the basin is only for washing hands how can we protect the painted work surface from water drips? The paint used on it is from B&Q home range furniture paint in a satin finish. Will two or three coats of this be enough or will we need some other sort of water sealant as well?

We did think we would need to buy a new waterproof worktop for the sideboard but someone said we didn’t really need to, any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance

Teresa
Teresa
Reply to  William Stewart
2 years ago

Thank you very much for the advice.

Reya
Reya
2 years ago

I’ve been searching for months how to waterproof wood safely for my shower walls. In person everyone says “no” and the internet is all over the board. I’m chemically sensitive as well, so I need to use something that is low or no VOCs AFTER curing. I have no problem working with a respirator, good airflow and even outside if curing needs sunlight. I don’t mind waiting hours, days or even weeks for the method to fully cure. There will also be an excellent air vent in the shower. So my question is; Is there a way to truly waterproof wood well in enough for inside a steamy shower? And if so, what to use and how to do so with little to no VOCs after curing? Thank you for your insight!

Reya
Reya
Reply to  William Stewart
2 years ago

Excellent! Epoxy is exactly what I was thinking about using! Thank you so much!

Sandi
Sandi
2 years ago

Super helpful article, thank you! I’ve got a new teak bathroom vanity. The manufacturer recommends a clear matte varnish. Is it ok to just do the outside of the unit and the inside of the drawers, or should I also do the inside of the cabinet that won’t really be subjected to any water contact?

Adam
Adam
3 years ago

Hey William. I want to purchase a bamboo bench to put in my shower. It says its waterproofed already but I’ve read reviews on it where customers stated mold started growing. Is there a product I can use to waterproof it to prevent mold and mildew growing on it?

Mallow Robinson
Mallow Robinson
3 years ago

William, I’m new at all this and very confused. I have an unfinished butcher block wood surround that absolutely needs to be waterproof. It also needs to be stained. Do I stain, use tung oil (and how much vinegar do I add?), General Finishes Topcoat after staining? Can you give me a “first do this, then this” answer? And product info would be really appreciated. Thank you.

Ginger
Ginger
3 years ago

I have Thompsons wood sealant. Will that be sufficient???

Stacy
Stacy
3 years ago

Hi there! I just saw this article! 🙂 Super great. Question – I have made a 10′ red oak vanity, I would like to add a little stain color to it, but need it waterproofed since the sinks/faucets will sit on it. I was trying to sort through all your comments, but got a little confused as to which would be best? Thanks in advance!!

Sheila Nelson
Sheila Nelson
3 years ago

Hi I am doing a van conversion and using tongue and groove pine ceiling in the van. I would like to run the ceiling across the whole van and was wondering how to seal it so it works for the roof of the shower as well.

Thanks
Sheila

Nicole
Nicole
3 years ago

Hi there,

I’m renovating my bathroom and want to make a natural wood panel look for the drop in tub skirt. What would you recommend we seal it with so it doesn’t accumulate drip stains over time? (Some one has told me to use yacht varnish)
Also would you be able to recommend a type of wood that would work best for
this?

Cheers,
Nicole

Pam Neitzke
Pam Neitzke
3 years ago

Hi William I am putting in a pine toung and groove ascent wall in my bathroom. Will not be in direct contact with water but moisture from the shower. Can I use tung oil to protect the wood?

Emma Loofe
Emma Loofe
3 years ago

I currently have 2 large floating vanity shelves. They are oak. They were custom made and came ready to be installed. I want to if possible, sand them down as they have yellowed and I want a much more “chalked” paler look. Can you advise me on what to use to achieve this???

Marnie
Marnie
3 years ago

We’re doing a loft conversion and an exposed overhead wooden beam will be directly within the showering area in the en-suite. What’s the best way to protect a structural beam from the water and steam? Many thanks

Daniela
Daniela
3 years ago

William thank you for the excellent article. I’m turning an antique desk into a vanity with a vessel sink. The desk has a Birdeye maple veneer top that has some cracking which I don’t mind. I would like to protect the veneer against heavy water exposure. Would you suggest an epoxy?

Pam
Pam
3 years ago

I have a vanity made out of coachwood, at the moment the cabinet maker used organoil , I have applied at least 4 coats and the slightest drop of water leaves a mark, could you recommend anything better to use please.

Kristin C
Kristin C
3 years ago

What would you recommend for a child sensory/water table made from pine that would be exposed to water, things with food coloring, etc to prevent water damage and staining from the food coloring?

randy carpenter
randy carpenter
3 years ago

I was planning to use sascho symphony to seal the logs in my bathroom. It is a water based product. Will this work and if so, how many coats should I apply?

Saurabh Gupta
Saurabh Gupta
3 years ago

Hi William

Would spray coating a bathroom door with a NC paint be advisable

Joyce
Joyce
3 years ago

I stained a bathroom vanity and then used Varathane on it. After doing so I realized that will not produce a waterproof surface. What can I do now to make this surface waterproof? Do I have to and off the finish before using a sealer or other product to make it waterproof.

Rod
Rod
3 years ago

Can you use both the tung oil and the stain sealant on bathroom countertops?

Kim
Kim
3 years ago

Hi William I am in the process of doing a Shiplap wall in my bathroom I want to make sure no moisture or mold get into it i also put along top of shower , not sure what to use for the gaps and ends of wood .. I want to stain it and waterproof it not sure what is best to use .. thanks

Mandy
Mandy
3 years ago

Hi William
We have fitted a countertop basin to an old pine dresser in our bathroom and have decided to tile the top as it’s already becoming water marked but how should we protect the surrounding wood which we’ve already waxed a couple of times
Thanks very much
Mandy

Mark
Mark
3 years ago

Hi William
I am making a tongue and groove bath panel set. I would like a driftwood sort of colour, what would you recommend that is also waterproof as the wood, would be direct on the floor which does get wet.

Arielle
Arielle
3 years ago

I am making a jumbo pegboard shelf for my bathroom what would you recommend to seal the insides of the holes for the pegs and the edges? What brands too? Thanks for the help.

Ken Bryer
Ken Bryer
3 years ago

hello William,
Your article and comments are helpful and insightful. We have an oak worktop in the kitchen with the sink fitted into it, and the tap projects through the wood. I have finished with Osmo oil, which claims to be for worktops, but after only a short time the wood under the tap starts to go black and I have to sand down and start again. Is there anything more durable to resist the constant drip of water when wet hands operate the tap? Your advice would be much appreciated.

Mary Kay
Mary Kay
3 years ago

Hi William-we are making thick mahogany shelves for our large walk-in shower. They will be hung from the ceiling.They will be in high humidity but not direct water. What is the best finish to use? Thanks!

Nina
Nina
3 years ago

Hello William,
Your post is very informative. I am purchasing a folding shower seat either made with walnut wood or finish(not sure). The seller says that it does not need to be sealed. How do i protect it from mold and mildew. after reading through your blog, I found boiled linseed oil at home depot. Will this do and keep the shower bench from rot, mold and mildew and water-proofed. What other steps I can take to ensure that the bench last s longer without any issues down the road. Advice is appreciated. Thanks!

Patrick
Patrick
3 years ago

Hi William,

I plan on turning my laundry into a bathroom, now my problem is the shower will be within the window and worried the wooden frame of the window will rot in time when it gets wet. Is there a way to protect the wood with another layer of waterproofing? The frame already has paint on it too.

Your feedback would be appreciated. Thank you.

Kay
Kay
3 years ago

Hi William,
I’ve had to purchase a “ready to paint” bath panel which I want to paint with colour matched paint to the vanity. The vanity is an eggshell finish so what would you recommend I use to seal the bath panel to ensure I have a similar finish

Rachael M
Rachael M
3 years ago

Hey William,

We are making a cabinet for a bathroom that is made of both solid wood and plywood. We wanted to stain it espresso. After reading your great article I wanted to find a stain/sealer combo but I am really struggling to find an interior one. I’ve mostly come across exterior ones. Is this too excessive for the project? What stain/sealer would you recommend? Thank you!

Annette van Brakel
Annette van Brakel
3 years ago

Hi William,
I have inherited an late 19th C, early 20th century Swedish kitchen chair. I would like to use it in the corner of a large bathroom. We have mechanical fan above the glassed in shower cubicle and a window that can open next to the bathtub. It is safe to keep this chair in a bathroom? Is it suitable for oiling? Does beeswax count as oiling? TIA, Annette

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